Foreign languages via Skype
   
+7 (919) 164-29-55
Open the main menu
Open the language menu

English collocations

2009.09.11
English collocations

Do you want to enlarge your vocabulary? How can you do it? The answer is simple! You need to work with collocations. But what does “collocation” mean?

A lot of people think that learning vocabulary is just learning more new words. That’s not enough! We also must know some expressions combined with a word. English words have friends and you need to know who they are. We call this friendship "collocation". Remember that it’s a very important part of learning vocabulary.

Besides collocation is how words go together with other words, it tells us which words can come before or after other words.

Let’s have a look at some examples of collocations and try to remember them. For instance, everyone uses the word “house” but not all know the expressions with it.

verb + house

build a house

share a house

demolish a house

renovate a house

break into a house

move house

common expressions

live in a house

stay at someone’s house

pass someone’s house

lock yourself out of the house

In every house we have stairs. Could you name the collocations that go with it?

verb + stairs

use ⁄ take the stairs

climb the stairs

run up ⁄ down the stairs

fall down the stairs

common expressions

carry something up ⁄ down the stairs

a flight of stairs

the top ⁄ bottom of the stairs

The house consists of different rooms. And it’s important to learn the collocations of the word “room”!

verb + room

share a room

tidy your room

let out rooms

common expressions

a bright room

a comfortable room

a tidy ⁄ an untidy room

a single ⁄ twin ⁄ double room

the spare room

the next room

the room is crowded

the room is locked

a waiting room (at the station or hospital)

You know a lot of collocations, you speak fluently! Your speaking skills depend on having a large store of words and expressions which you don't need to think about or construct every time you speak English.

comments powered by Disqus
Order a trial lesson